A property appraiser assesses value by taking into consideration everything that's permanently associated with the property. This includes the property's size and location, and whether it provides a view. If there is a building on the property, the appraiser will look at physical characteristics such as age, the number of bedrooms, and the overall condition of the structure. The appraiser will also consider the value of similar properties in the neighborhood when making a valuation.
The BauGB defines the Verkehrswert or Marktwert (market value, both terms with identical meaning) as follows: "The market value is determined by the price that can be realized at the date of valuation, in an arm's length transaction, with due regard to the legal situation and the effective characteristics, the nature and lay of the premises or any other subject of the valuation"[19] (non-official translation). The intention, as in other countries, is to include all objective influences and to exclude all influences resulting from the subjective circumstances of the involved parties.
In the United States, the most common usage relates to real estate and personal property appraisals, while the term is often used to describe a person specially appointed by a judicial or quasi-judicial authority to put a valuation on property, e.g. on the items of an inventory of the Tangible Property of an Estate (IRS law) of a deceased person or on land taken for public purposes by the right of eminent domain. Appraisers of imported goods and boards of general appraisers have extensive functions in administering the customs laws of the United States. Merchant appraisers are sometimes appointed temporarily under the revenue laws to value where there is no resident appraiser without holding the office of appraiser (U.S. Rev. Stats. § 2609).[1]

ISA members are the recognized authorities on professional personal property appraising and are distinguished for their professionalism, knowledge, and expertise. ISA members at the Certified and Accredited levels are Qualified Appraisers as defined by The Appraisal Foundation, which is authorized by Congress as the source of appraisal standards and qualifications.
In accordance with Section 193.122, Florida Statutes, Public Notice is hereby given that the Property Appraiser has recertified the 2017 Real and Tangible Personal Property Assessment Rolls at the close of business day on June 26, 2018. This recertification reflects all changes made by the Value Adjustment Board prior to May 23, 2018, together with any adjustments or changes made by the Property Appraiser.
While no appraiser is infallible, his or her opinion of the value of your home is informed by rigorous training, numerous tests, several years of on-the-job experience and required continuing education. They are also required to substantiate every finding in their reports that could influence a home’s value. Appraisers and their employers (often appraisal management companies) are heavily regulated. Consequences of issuing deliberately misleading or biased reports can be severe, so appraisers work hard to remain impartial and keep personal value judgments and prejudices out of their work.

As experienced State Certified Residential Real Estate Appraisers, our commitment is to provide our clients with superior service using the most current research data and technology to establish accurate market valuations with rapid turn-around times. Our home appraisals conform to the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP). A complete appraisal


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Barkett Realty offers commercial appraisal services through its subsidiary, Property Valuation Specialists (PVS), which is also located in our beautiful St. Petersburg office and managed by John Barkett.  Through extensive experience, PVS assists clients in solving concerns surrounding complex real estate valuation. Through PVS, Barkett Realty clients can obtain independent fee appraisal services.
The general condition of the building and grounds will also be taken into consideration. For example, the status of the foundation and the condition of the roof may require repairs and renovations. In addition to the building itself, the land that it stands on can also play a factor in the analysis. It is common for an appraiser to take photographs of the property, both inside and out in order to document its condition.
The Trainee Appraiser level does not have an experience requirement. Each Trainee Appraiser must be supervised to get the required hours of experience before applying for the Licensed Residential Appraiser level. Locating a certified appraiser is a very important step to becoming an appraiser. The trainee and supervisory appraiser must keep a log of work completed that will be reviewed when the trainee applies for any license to the state regulatory body. Effective January 1, 2015, all new Trainee (Beginning) Appraisers and Supervisory Appraisers are required to complete an approved Supervisor/Trainee course before they will be able to log experience hours.
Barkett Realty is a perceptive team of professionals focused in the Tampa Bay area. Relationships and communication are at the forefront of our business and our team culture encourages open communication about market data, trends and activity. We use industry-leading technology, local resources and our network of contacts to identify opportunities for our clients.
Remember this: appraisers are looking at the condition of what’s permanently part of or attached to the house. They’re not evaluating the décor or furniture or anything that’s not affixed to the property; what’s most important are your home’s physical characteristics (age, square footage, the number of bedrooms and baths, lot size, location, view) as well as their observable condition.

The proposed property tax rate, or millage rate, is set by various taxing authorities. Pinellas County is one taxing authority. There are others, such as the School Board and the individual municipalities. Based on their proposed budgets, they determine a “proposed” millage rate. One mill is equal to $1 for every $1,000 of taxable property value. Once the proposed millage rate is set, the taxing authority cannot raise it, though it is permitted to set it at a lower rate.
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