Summary:Commercial Real Estate Appraisals & Brokerage for various commercial property types, including multifamily apartment complexes, mix use vacant land, retail, proposed retail, industrial, office, office condominiums, vacant land subdivisions, mobile home parks, hotel, motels, shopping centers, eminent domain takings, highest and best use analysis, agricultural property, restaurants, insurable values, leased fee valuations, medical office, ad valorem tax disputes, among other property types ...
The role of a real estate appraiser is to provide honest, impartial and objective opinions regarding the market value of the property in the form of an appraisal. This service plays a huge role in assisting those who own, manage, sell, invest, and/or lend money on the security of real estate. Appraisers will gather facts, stats, and any other information regarding said property. From there they will put their analytical skills to test in analyzing this data, exercising sound judgement, and communicating this effectively in their appraisal report.
The Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA) demanded all the states to develop systems for licensing and certifying real estate appraisers.[26] To accomplish this, the Appraisal Subcommittee (ASC) was formed within the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC), with representatives from the various Federal mortgage regulatory agencies.[27] Thus, currently all the real estate appraisers must be state-licensed and certified. But prior to the 1990s, there were no commonly accepted standards either for appraisal quality or for appraiser licensure. In the 1980s, an ad-hoc committee representing various appraisal professional organizations in the United States and Canada met to codify the best practices into what became known as the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP). The U.S. Savings and Loan Crisis resulted in increased federal regulation via the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989, which required federal lending regulators to adopt appraisal standards. A nonprofit organization, The Appraisal Foundation (TAF), was formed by the same organizations that had developed USPAP, and the copyright for USPAP was signed over to TAF. Federal oversight of TAF is provided by the Appraisal Subcommittee, made up of representatives of various federal lending regulators. TAF carries out its work through two boards: the Appraisal Standards Board promulgates and updates USPAP; the Appraisal Qualifications Board (AQB) promulgates minimum recommended standards for appraiser certification and licensure. During the 1990s, all of the states adopted USPAP as the governing standards within their states and developed licensure standards which met or exceeded the recommendations of TAF. Also, the various state and federal courts have adopted USPAP for real estate litigation and all of the federally lending regulators adopt USPAP for mortgage finance appraisal.[27]
This article is largely based on an article in the out-of-copyright Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, which was produced in 1911. It should be brought up to date to reflect subsequent history or scholarship (including the references, if any). When you have completed the review, replace this notice with a simple note on this article's talk page. (November 2017)
There is a key distinction between the role of a real estate agent and a valuer, as an agent may advocate for its principal's interests, whereas a valuer must impartially and independently provide opinion as to value. Lawyers, Conveyancers and Real Estate Agents are permitted to act in the sale of real estate under quite different legislation from that which governs valuers. The provision for the role in relation to Lawyers and Conveyancers is the Lawyers and Conveyancers 2006.
By state law, we must personally view each property in Broward County at least once every five years. That is why our residential appraisers are busy these days inspecting, measuring and photographing the exteriors of properties throughout Broward. Our appraisers are easy to recognize: all of them wear official shirts and bright orange vests clearly identifying them as BCPA staff, and each carries a BCPA photo identification card and badge. Feel free to ask to see an ID if you have any concerns. Important Note: Our appraisers will NEVER ask to enter your home, and we will NEVER enter locked backyards. If you have questions about these inspections, please contact our office at 954.357.6831.
Mail: Request public records by mail. Send your request to: Public Records Request, Pinellas County Marketing & Communications, located at, 333 Chestnut St., Clearwater, FL 33756. To help us expedite and avoid delays in processing your request, please be as detailed as possible with the information you are requesting. The request will be reviewed and forwarded to the department liaison responsible for processing your request. You will be notified by mail to let you know that your request has been received and the steps required to complete your request.
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