The Pinellas County property appraiser is responsible for finding, locating, and fairly valuing all property within Pinellas County with the purpose of assessing the taxable value. It's generally done at market value, which is essentially what someone would pay for the current state of your property. To get questions answered about your appraisal, find a property appraiser, or appeal a decision made by a property appraiser in Pinellas County, you can contact them at the following address:

However, the recent trend of the business tends to be toward the use of a scientific methodology of appraisal which relies on the foundation of quantitative-data,[10] risk, and geographical based approaches.[11][12] Pagourtzi et al. have provided a review on the methods used in the industry by comparison between conventional approaches and advanced ones.[13]

Amortization Annual Income Appraisal Appraisal Fee APR ARM Balloon Payment Bankruptcy Borrower Cash-Out Refinance Closing Checklist Closing Costs Closing Disclosure Co-Borrower Conventional Loan Cosigner Credit History Credit Report Credit Requirements Debt Ratio Disclosure Discount Points Down Payment Down Payment Grant Earnest Money Eligibility Equity Escrow Fannie Mae FHA FHA Funding Fee FHA Handbook FHA Limits FHA Loan FHA Minimum Standards FHA One-Time Close FHA Refinance FHA Requirements FICO Score First-Time Homebuyer Fixed Rate Mortgage Foreclosure Freddie Mac Good Faith Estimate Home Equity Loan Home Inspection HUD HUD-1 Settlement Statement Identity Theft Interest Rate Joint Loan Jumbo Loan Lender Loan Application Loan Approval Loan Balance Loan Officer Loan Term Loan-to-Value Ratio MIP Monthly Payment Mortgage Mortgage Closing Obama Mortgage Origination Fee Owner Occupied PMI Pre-Approval Prepayment Prequalification Principal Property Tax Property Title Reverse Mortgage Second Mortgage Single Family Home Streamline Refinance Subprime Mortgage
There can be differences between what the property is really worth (market value) and what it cost to buy it (price). A price paid might not represent that property's market value. Sometimes, special considerations may have been present, such as a special relationship between the buyer and the seller where one party had control or significant influence over the other party. In other cases, the transaction may have been just one of several properties sold or traded between two parties. In such cases, the price paid for any particular piece is not its market "value" (with the idea usually being, though, that all the pieces and prices add up to the market value of all the parts) but rather its market "price".
The seller can lower the price.If the home was overpriced or the value was inflated, often this is the best solution. It makes the buyer happy and the lender is satisfied. There is no guarantee that if the buyer walks away, the seller won't receive a low appraisal from the second buyer's lender, not to mention the time and trouble it takes to sell the property again. Sometimes a bird in the hand is best.

Unfortunately, recent distressed sales in the surrounding area can lower your home's appraisal value. If you feel that your home's value has been dragged down by the sales prices of nearby foreclosures and short sales, you may be able to convince the appraiser that your home is worth more if it's in significantly better condition than those properties. Sellers should also know that federal guidelines (intended to eliminate the inflated appraisal values that contributed to the 2008 housing crisis) sometimes cause appraisals to come in below fair market value and can make low appraisals difficult to challenge.
An appraisal is an unbiased professional opinion of a home's value. Appraisals are almost always used in purchase and sale transactions and commonly used in refinance transactions. In a purchase and sale transaction, an appraisal is used to determine whether the home's contract price is appropriate given the home's condition, location, and features. In a refinance, it assures the lender that it isn't handing the borrower more money than the home is worth. 
Other leading appraisal organizations include the National Association of Independent Fee Appraisers and the National Association of Master Appraisers, which were also founding sponsor-members of the Appraisal Foundation.[29] The Massachusetts Board of Real Estate Appraisers (MBREA), founded in 1934, is the only state appraisal association that has been named a sponsor of the Appraisal Foundation.[30] In recent years, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) has become highly regarded in the United States, and has formed a collaboration with the Counselors of Real Estate, a division of the National Association of Realtors. RICS, which is headquartered in London, operates on a global scale and awards the designations MRICS and FRICS to Members and Fellows of RICS. The Real Estate Counseling Group of America is a small group of top U.S. appraisers and real estate analysts who have collectively authored a disproportionately large body of appraisal methodology and, the National Association of Real Estate Appraisers (NAREA), founded in 1966, with the goal to elevate the professionalism and success of the Appraisal Industry.
The scope of work is the first step in any appraisal process. Without a strictly defined scope of work, an appraisal's conclusions may not be viable. By defining the scope of work, an appraiser can properly develop a value for a given property for the intended user, and for the intended use of the appraisal. The whole idea of "scope of work" is to provide clear expectations and guidelines for all parties as to what the appraisal report does, and does not, cover; and how much work has gone into it.
In the United States, the most common usage relates to real estate and personal property appraisals, while the term is often used to describe a person specially appointed by a judicial or quasi-judicial authority to put a valuation on property, e.g. on the items of an inventory of the Tangible Property of an Estate (IRS law) of a deceased person or on land taken for public purposes by the right of eminent domain. Appraisers of imported goods and boards of general appraisers have extensive functions in administering the customs laws of the United States. Merchant appraisers are sometimes appointed temporarily under the revenue laws to value where there is no resident appraiser without holding the office of appraiser (U.S. Rev. Stats. § 2609).[1]
An appraisal is an unbiased professional opinion of a home's value. Appraisals are almost always used in purchase and sale transactions and commonly used in refinance transactions. In a purchase and sale transaction, an appraisal is used to determine whether the home's contract price is appropriate given the home's condition, location, and features. In a refinance, it assures the lender that it isn't handing the borrower more money than the home is worth. 
When evaluating a property's value, appraisers note the characteristics of the property and surrounding area, such as a view or noisy highway nearby. They also consider the overall condition of a building, including its foundation and roof or any renovations that may have been done. Appraisers photograph the outside of the building and some of the interior features to document its condition. After visiting the property, the appraiser analyzes the property relative to comparable home sales, including lease records, location, view, previous appraisals, and income potential. During the entire process, appraisers record their research, observations, and methods used in providing an estimate of the property’s value.
Barkett Realty offers commercial appraisal services through its subsidiary, Property Valuation Specialists (PVS), which is also located in our beautiful St. Petersburg office and managed by John Barkett.  Through extensive experience, PVS assists clients in solving concerns surrounding complex real estate valuation. Through PVS, Barkett Realty clients can obtain independent fee appraisal services.
I want to take a moment to tell you of a most amazing experience I had at your office today. Deanne Holder waited on me and my daughter, Kelley DiSalvo, as we were trying to make heads or tails of some small pieces of property that belonged to my deceased husband, John Pat Krause, and me. Some of the lots were in low land and one piece of property didn't even have an address, except the address of the next door neighbor. Deanne very, very patiently looked up each and every parcel and helped us see the adjoining property owners so we can contact them, where needed, and also take the necessary steps to finally dispose of the remaining lots. I can see that Deanne is a treasure to your office and the citizens of Leon County.
When everything goes smoothly, the home appraisal is just another box to tick on a closing checklist. When the appraisal value is lower than expected, the transaction can be delayed or even canceled. Regardless of which situation you encounter in your home buying, selling or refinancing experience, a basic understanding of how the appraisal process functions can only work in your favor.
At other times, a buyer may willingly pay a premium price, above the generally accepted market value, if his subjective valuation of the property (its investment value for him) was higher than the market value. One specific example of this is an owner of a neighboring property who, by combining his own property with the subject property, could obtain economies-of-scale. Similar situations sometimes happen in corporate finance. For example, this can occur when a merger or acquisition happens at a price which is higher than the value represented by the price of the underlying stock. The usual explanation for these types of mergers and acquisitions is that "the sum is greater than its parts", since full ownership of a company provides full control of it. This is something that purchasers will sometimes pay a high price for. This situation can happen in real estate purchases too.
Mail: Request public records by mail. Send your request to: Public Records Request, Pinellas County Marketing & Communications, located at, 333 Chestnut St., Clearwater, FL 33756. To help us expedite and avoid delays in processing your request, please be as detailed as possible with the information you are requesting. The request will be reviewed and forwarded to the department liaison responsible for processing your request. You will be notified by mail to let you know that your request has been received and the steps required to complete your request.
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