When evaluating a property's value, appraisers note the characteristics of the property and surrounding area, such as a view or noisy highway nearby. They also consider the overall condition of a building, including its foundation and roof or any renovations that may have been done. Appraisers photograph the outside of the building and some of the interior features to document its condition. After visiting the property, the appraiser analyzes the property relative to comparable home sales, including lease records, location, view, previous appraisals, and income potential. During the entire process, appraisers record their research, observations, and methods used in providing an estimate of the property’s value.
NOTICE: The Hillsborough County Property Appraiser’s office has released an addendum to its Invitation For Bid No. 8254, Full Hybrid (Gas-Electric) car leasing project. This addendum includes a revision to the minimum requirement for the Excess Wear & Tear Agreement, the removal of the requirement for a Non-Appropriation of Funds Clause, and an extension of both the Response Submittal Deadline and Tentative Award Date. For details of the addendum, please click here.
One of the most recognized professional organizations of real estate appraisers in America is the Appraisal Institute (AI). It was formed from the merger of the American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers and the Society of Real Estate Appraisers. Founded along with others in the 1930s, the two organizations merged in the 1990s to form the AI. This group awards two professional designations: SRA, to residential appraisers, and MAI, to commercial appraisers. The Institute has enacted rigorous regulations regarding the use and display of these designations. For example, contrary to popular belief, "MAI" does not stand for "Member, Appraisal Institute". According to the institute, the letters "do not represent specific words", and an MAI may not use the words "Member, Appraisal Institute" in lieu of the MAI mark. The primary motive for this rule is to prevent trademark dilution.
After speaking with the county on Friday, we realized we needed an appraisal very quickly for a plan submission that coming Monday. Based on prior excellent reviews, and clear FEMA experience, I gave John a call.  I would not normally expect someone to turn around an appraisal that quickly, never mind over the weekend, but John was able to fit it into his schedule and didn't miss a beat.  He was at the property on Saturday and had an appraisal to us on Sunday.  It was exactly the work product we needed and it definitely saved the day.  John is very personable and professional.  He will definitely be my go-to appraisal source and referral.
While the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) has always required appraisers to identify the scope of work needed to produce credible results, it became clear in recent years[when?] that appraisers did not fully understand the process for developing this adequately. In formulating the scope of work for a credible appraisal, the concept of a limited versus complete appraisal and the use of the Departure Rule caused confusion to clients, appraisers, and appraisal reviewers. In order to deal with this, USPAP was updated in 2006 with what came to be known as the Scope of Work Project. Following this, USPAP eliminated both the Departure Rule and the concept of a limited appraisal, and a new Scope of Work rule was created. In this, appraisers were to identify six key parts of the appraisal problem at the beginning of each assignment:

I spoke with John about getting an appraisal for the home I was purchasing and even though it was short notice, he was able to fit me in the next week. I gave him my information and told him the last inspector I called had agreed but had to back out when he found out how large the house was, but John said it would be no problem, and figured it would take a couple of days to do the appraisal and get the proper amount of comps. I had no problem with his fee, as I know that large houses can cost even more to inspect and appraise and thought his prices were reasonable-- especially considering how quickly he was going to get it done. Right after our phone conversation he sent me an email and sent the contract, which I signed and emailed back, and gave him my credit card info., which made it very easy to deal with versus writing another check-- which you write so many of in the house purchasing process. He arrived promptly and introduced himself, and was just as pleasant in person as he was on the phone. He did a thorough job of going through the house, and really seemed to know his business very well. He was nice enough to point out some positive aspects about the house we were purchasing, and pointed out many details. He was very knowledgeable about the housing industry and houses in general as well, and after business talk, it was nice he took the time to just chit chat for a bit. After speaking with me on the phone and chatting at the house, he gave me some great information about places he thought I would be interested in visiting, because he figured out pretty quickly I was a nerd who would be into some of the places he mentioned. He was right! Great information and advice! I really enjoyed doing business with John, who I found interesting, knowledgeable, and excellent to work with, and if I ever need another appraisal, he is definitely the one to call! I would highly recommend him to anyone who wants the best service in this business!
Summary:Commercial Real Estate Appraisals & Brokerage for various commercial property types, including multifamily apartment complexes, mix use vacant land, retail, proposed retail, industrial, office, office condominiums, vacant land subdivisions, mobile home parks, hotel, motels, shopping centers, eminent domain takings, highest and best use analysis, agricultural property, restaurants, insurable values, leased fee valuations, medical office, ad valorem tax disputes, among other property types ...
The federal government regulates appraisers indirectly because if the Appraisal Subcommittee (ASC) of the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) finds that a particular state's appraiser regulation and certification program is inadequate, then under federal regulations all appraisers in that state would no longer be eligible to conduct appraisals for federally chartered banks.[25] The ASC oversees the TAF. Banks make widespread use of mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities, and would be unable to do so without appraisals.
The general condition of the building and grounds will also be taken into consideration. For example, the status of the foundation and the condition of the roof may require repairs and renovations. In addition to the building itself, the land that it stands on can also play a factor in the analysis. It is common for an appraiser to take photographs of the property, both inside and out in order to document its condition.
The Pinellas County property appraiser is responsible for finding, locating, and fairly valuing all property within Pinellas County with the purpose of assessing the taxable value. It's generally done at market value, which is essentially what someone would pay for the current state of your property. To get questions answered about your appraisal, find a property appraiser, or appeal a decision made by a property appraiser in Pinellas County, you can contact them at the following address:

Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.
FHA.com is not a government agency. We do not offer or have any affiliation with loan modification, foreclosure prevention, payday loan, or short term loan services. Neither FHA.com nor its advertisers charge a fee or require anything other than a submission of qualifying information for comparison shopping ads. We do not ask users to surrender or transfer title. We do not ask users to bypass their lender. We encourage users to contact their lawyers, credit counselors, lenders, and housing counselors.
Mail: Request public records by mail. Send your request to: Public Records Request, Pinellas County Marketing & Communications, located at, 333 Chestnut St., Clearwater, FL 33756. To help us expedite and avoid delays in processing your request, please be as detailed as possible with the information you are requesting. The request will be reviewed and forwarded to the department liaison responsible for processing your request. You will be notified by mail to let you know that your request has been received and the steps required to complete your request.
×