Our office is always looking to grow and better serve the residents of Polk County and you can help us achieve our goal by becoming part of our team. As an equal opportunity employer, offering a great working environment with competitive pay and substantial benefits; the PCPA office can provide you with new opportunities and the start of a rewarding career.
Are you worried about receiving a low appraisal or has your appraisal already been completed at a value less than you expected? We're sorry this has happened to you. In seller's markets, multiple offer situations often drive up the purchase price higher than any comparable sales in the area; which is why in those instances many sellers worry the appraisals will come in low. In buyer's markets, when prices are soft or falling, sellers are also concerned that the appraisal will be a low appraisal.
If you purchased a new home after January 1, 2018, you may pre-file now for tax year 2019 Homestead and other exemptions. The timely filing period for Homestead Exemption for 2019 is March 2, 2018 through March 1, 2019. The absolute deadline to LATE FILE for any 2019 exemption -- if you miss the March 1 timely filing deadline -- is September 18, 2019. State law (Sec. 196.011(8), Fla. Stat.) does not allow late filing for exemptions after this date, regardless of any good cause reason for missing the late filing deadline. Please click on the following link for more information about Homestead and other exemptions for which you may be eligible http://bcpa.net/homestead.asp.
Despite the fact that appraising becomes a more and more complex task every year, we're able to keep our prices reasonable and quality high by employing technology. Of course, it's been our experience that regardless of the industry, service is the main reason a client comes, goes, stays or refers others. We treat everyone like we'd want to be treated ourselves whether we're in person, on the phone or communicating in e-mail. Our objective is simply a superior experience for our clients. Experience first hand why we're the appraisal firm for you. Call us today.
In the United States, appraisals are for a certain type of value (e.g., foreclosure value, fair market value, distressed sale value, investment value). The most commonly used definition of value is Market Value. While Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) does not define Market Value, it provides general guidance for how Market Value should be defined:
After speaking with the county on Friday, we realized we needed an appraisal very quickly for a plan submission that coming Monday. Based on prior excellent reviews, and clear FEMA experience, I gave John a call.  I would not normally expect someone to turn around an appraisal that quickly, never mind over the weekend, but John was able to fit it into his schedule and didn't miss a beat.  He was at the property on Saturday and had an appraisal to us on Sunday.  It was exactly the work product we needed and it definitely saved the day.  John is very personable and professional.  He will definitely be my go-to appraisal source and referral.
This week, at the IAAO International meeting, valued members of the OCPA team made presentations to their colleagues. Roger Ross gave a wildly popular presentation on the Agency’s commitment to customer service. Terry Taylor and Jeff Miller also presented an educational session on “Agriculture in the Land of Amusement,” sharing information of the diversity of properties within Orange County.  

NOTICE: The Hillsborough County Property Appraiser’s office has released an addendum to its Invitation For Bid No. 8254, Full Hybrid (Gas-Electric) car leasing project. This addendum includes a revision to the minimum requirement for the Excess Wear & Tear Agreement, the removal of the requirement for a Non-Appropriation of Funds Clause, and an extension of both the Response Submittal Deadline and Tentative Award Date. For details of the addendum, please click here.
A property appraiser assesses value by taking into consideration everything that's permanently associated with the property. This includes the property's size and location, and whether it provides a view. If there is a building on the property, the appraiser will look at physical characteristics such as age, the number of bedrooms, and the overall condition of the structure. The appraiser will also consider the value of similar properties in the neighborhood when making a valuation.
Congratulations to the Town of Eatonville Florida for winning a $25,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for improving the overall health of its residents. Initiatives such as Healthy Eatonville Place caught the attention of the foundation because of its community outreach success in diabetes prevention and management. Town officials also showcased programs addressing economic issues that affect physical health like access to healthy food with a community garden with organic fruits and vegetables offered free of charge to residents. As one of the smallest cities or towns in Orange County, Eatonville is an excellent example of grass roots problem solving.  
Remember this: appraisers are looking at the condition of what’s permanently part of or attached to the house. They’re not evaluating the décor or furniture or anything that’s not affixed to the property; what’s most important are your home’s physical characteristics (age, square footage, the number of bedrooms and baths, lot size, location, view) as well as their observable condition.
Real estate valuation in New Zealand is regulated by the New Zealand Institute of Valuers ('NZIV') and the Valuers Registration Board of New Zealand ('VRB'), both of which are statutory bodies established under the Valuers Act 1948 (NZ). The NZIV remains the statutory professional body for valuers in New Zealand, with perpetual succession under the Act (which is under review as at 2015). The NZIV can make Rules as lower level legislation and has a Code of Ethics. The NZIV Rules were last changed in 2012 and remain current. The VRB has jurisdiction in relation to serious matters affecting the registration of a valuer including discipline where a valuer has acted in such a way as to meet the threshold. The Valuers Act 1948 sets the threshold under s31 as matters where a valuer could be struck off the register of valuers. The NZIV has power for discipline for relatively more minor matters. The NZIV governs NZIV members and has power to discipline members and fine them up to $500, admonish members or terminate their membership. The designations "Registered Valuer" and "Public Valuer" are legally protected under the legislation, being reserved for Valuers Registered under the Act. The NZIV, under the Act, can admit non-valuer members (such as non-valuer land economists).

 	Congratulations to Rick Singh, CFA, and the Office of the Orange County Property Appraiser for this week's recognition by the International Association of Assessing Officers (IAAO)! We received the Certificate of Excellence in Assessment Administration for "demonstrating the highest levels of managerial excellence and consistent utilization of practices that exceed the guidelines ... in property assessment administration practices." Shown in the photo (L-R) are Jeff Miller, Terry Taylor, Roger Ross, Tatsiana Sokalava, Rick Singh, Ron Sullivan, and Fred Hill.	 

The Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA) demanded all the states to develop systems for licensing and certifying real estate appraisers.[26] To accomplish this, the Appraisal Subcommittee (ASC) was formed within the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC), with representatives from the various Federal mortgage regulatory agencies.[27] Thus, currently all the real estate appraisers must be state-licensed and certified. But prior to the 1990s, there were no commonly accepted standards either for appraisal quality or for appraiser licensure. In the 1980s, an ad-hoc committee representing various appraisal professional organizations in the United States and Canada met to codify the best practices into what became known as the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP). The U.S. Savings and Loan Crisis resulted in increased federal regulation via the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989, which required federal lending regulators to adopt appraisal standards. A nonprofit organization, The Appraisal Foundation (TAF), was formed by the same organizations that had developed USPAP, and the copyright for USPAP was signed over to TAF. Federal oversight of TAF is provided by the Appraisal Subcommittee, made up of representatives of various federal lending regulators. TAF carries out its work through two boards: the Appraisal Standards Board promulgates and updates USPAP; the Appraisal Qualifications Board (AQB) promulgates minimum recommended standards for appraiser certification and licensure. During the 1990s, all of the states adopted USPAP as the governing standards within their states and developed licensure standards which met or exceeded the recommendations of TAF. Also, the various state and federal courts have adopted USPAP for real estate litigation and all of the federally lending regulators adopt USPAP for mortgage finance appraisal.[27]
Real estate valuation in New Zealand is regulated by the New Zealand Institute of Valuers ('NZIV') and the Valuers Registration Board of New Zealand ('VRB'), both of which are statutory bodies established under the Valuers Act 1948 (NZ). The NZIV remains the statutory professional body for valuers in New Zealand, with perpetual succession under the Act (which is under review as at 2015). The NZIV can make Rules as lower level legislation and has a Code of Ethics. The NZIV Rules were last changed in 2012 and remain current. The VRB has jurisdiction in relation to serious matters affecting the registration of a valuer including discipline where a valuer has acted in such a way as to meet the threshold. The Valuers Act 1948 sets the threshold under s31 as matters where a valuer could be struck off the register of valuers. The NZIV has power for discipline for relatively more minor matters. The NZIV governs NZIV members and has power to discipline members and fine them up to $500, admonish members or terminate their membership. The designations "Registered Valuer" and "Public Valuer" are legally protected under the legislation, being reserved for Valuers Registered under the Act. The NZIV, under the Act, can admit non-valuer members (such as non-valuer land economists).

In the course of evaluating a property, an appraiser is expected to be alert and take notice of aspects and characteristics of the property, as well as the surrounding area, that could affect the value. This can include assessing the overall noise levels of the area, proximity to sources of recurring loud disturbances such as an airport or a railroad line, as well as the view offered by the property. Obstructions by neighboring buildings, for instance, could reduce the value of a property.

We have compiled property records in a single, comprehensive property report which can provide you with lots of answers to your questions. How high are current property taxes? Is an increase in property taxes expected for the next year? How much did the current owner pay for this property? Were there any permits filed recently on the property indicating repairs and maintenance work? What is the official size (square footage) of the property? How does the home's sales history look, judging from the available property deed records? Get answers to these questions using PropertyShark, so you can confidently make your home buying decision.

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