Real property appraisers usually value one property at a time, while assessors value many at once. However, both occupations use similar methods and techniques. As a result, assessors and appraisers tend to take the same courses for certification. In addition to passing a statewide examination, candidates must usually complete a set number of on-the-job hours.
If you're looking for an appraisal firm with the best commercial property appraisers in Saint Petersburg, you've come to the right place - we're the #1 appraisal company for privately procured commercial real estate appraisals in and around Saint Petersburg. All our Saint Petersburg commercial appraisers have extensive experience in performing a wide variety of commercial property appraisals. When choosing a commercial real estate appraiser, bear in mind that experience really matters. And a commercial appraisal is only as good as the commercial appraiser who produces it. Most people are surprised to learn that to become a state certified commercial property appraiser in Saint Petersburg, a candidate must spend at least three years in training learning the practices and procedures of commercial real estate appraisal. They spend this training period under the supervision of one or more seasoned and highly trained commercial real estate appraisers. And although the initial three-year training process is thorough, many more years of real world experience are required to become truly proficient. That's why all our appraisers have an absolute minimum of ten years of experience; and in fact, most of our appraisers have fifteen or more years of experience. So, if you need a commercial property appraisal in Saint Petersburg for your office, multi-family, retail, industrial, religious, mixed-use, or special use property, or for commercially zoned vacant land, call us for a free quote.

The International Valuation Standards Council (IVSC) is a non-governmental organization (NGO) member of the United Nations with membership that encompasses all the major national valuation standard-setters and professional associations from 41 different countries (including the Appraisal Institute, the American Society of Appraisers, the RICS, the [Practising Valuers Association of India] and the Appraisal Institute of Canada). IVSC publishes the International Valuation Standards (IVS), now in its 8th edition.
In the United States, the most common usage relates to real estate and personal property appraisals, while the term is often used to describe a person specially appointed by a judicial or quasi-judicial authority to put a valuation on property, e.g. on the items of an inventory of the Tangible Property of an Estate (IRS law) of a deceased person or on land taken for public purposes by the right of eminent domain. Appraisers of imported goods and boards of general appraisers have extensive functions in administering the customs laws of the United States. Merchant appraisers are sometimes appointed temporarily under the revenue laws to value where there is no resident appraiser without holding the office of appraiser (U.S. Rev. Stats. ยง 2609).[1]
While the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) has always required appraisers to identify the scope of work needed to produce credible results, it became clear in recent years[when?] that appraisers did not fully understand the process for developing this adequately. In formulating the scope of work for a credible appraisal, the concept of a limited versus complete appraisal and the use of the Departure Rule caused confusion to clients, appraisers, and appraisal reviewers. In order to deal with this, USPAP was updated in 2006 with what came to be known as the Scope of Work Project. Following this, USPAP eliminated both the Departure Rule and the concept of a limited appraisal, and a new Scope of Work rule was created. In this, appraisers were to identify six key parts of the appraisal problem at the beginning of each assignment:
In person: When requesting public records in person, you can stop by Pinellas County Marketing & Communications, located at, 333 Chestnut St., Clearwater, FL 33756. (727) 464-4600. Also, you may make a Public Record Request at any Pinellas County Department, click on the link for department information. http://www.pinellascounty.org/departments.htm. When you arrive, provide your public records request. To help us expedite and avoid delays in processing your request, please be as detailed as possible with the information you are requesting. The request will be reviewed and forwarded to the department liaison responsible for processing your request. You will be notified through your preferred communication method of updates relating to your request.
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